in

Dumbbell Chest Workout You Can Build Pectoral Muscle At Home

Dumbbell Chest Workout You Can Build Pectoral Muscle At Home

Dumbbells are one of the best pieces of fitness equipment out there to target your chest. They take care of strength imbalances and they target each of the three sections of your chest to ensure progress and results. Give a man a pair of dumbbells, and he can crank out a few sets of curls and bulk up his biceps. But give a man a pair of dumbbells and a plan, and he can change his entire body in a month.

If you want a bigger chest, do back exercises. Doing only pushups and bench presses will lead your chest-muscle fibers to tighten, pulling your shoulders forward (especially if you have a desk job). Offset that with rows; stronger back muscles will pull your shoulders back, allowing your chest fibers to broaden out visually.

Dumbbell chest workout solve a lot of logistical problems. With dumbbells, there’s no need to wait for machines, enlist a spotter, or find a place to install a suspension trainer. You don’t even need a gym membership as long as you have a bench and a parking spot’s worth of space. Adjustable dumbbells, relatively unusual 15 years ago, now are commonplace and affordable, eliminating the need for an expensive, space-sucking rack of iron at home. Best of all, dumbbells work for pretty much every lift. So while kettlebells or barbells might be ideal for some lifts, dumbbells are usually an adequate substitute for those moves—and preferable for others. And if you don’t have an adjustable bench at home, try propping up one end of the bench on a sturdy support, like cinderblocks or bricks.

Would it be even more appropriate to say that staying in shape may not be sufficient these days? Maybe, there’s something more that you can try and do to improve your looks by getting yourself well-developed muscles. Many of you may even try to undergo a trial of all sorts of strict regimen in order to get some of your muscles pumped-up. In the case of individuals who are looking to increase the size of their chest, including growing those muscles present in their chest, it becomes necessary to actively engage themselves in performing workouts frequently. If individuals continue to train with weights, their various muscles would be put to work that helps them gain adequate muscle strength.

Now you’re ready for a dumbbell chest workout just about anywhere—hotel gym, garage, or backyard.

The Best Dumbbell Chest Workout

Incline Dumbbell Chest Press

Incline Dumbbell Chest Press

The incline dumbbell press is a mixture of the dumbbell chest press and the shoulder press, and both the front deltoids and the upper portions of the chest muscles are trained in this exercise. Thanks to the inclination of the bench, many experience this exercise as easy on their shoulders and that they can get a nice, long range of motion.

  1. Lie on your back on an incline bench set to 45 degrees with your feet firmly on the floor and your arms extended over your chest, holding a dumbbell in each hand. Your palms should face forward.
  2. Slowly bend your arms to lower the dumbbells down and outward until they are on either side of your chest.
  3. Extend your arms straight up and over your chest again, pressing back up to the starting position. Pause briefly at the top before repeating for 8-12 reps.

Form tip: Don’t lower the dumbbells too deep, or you’ll risk injuring your shoulders. You should feel a nice stretch in your chest and still be able to see your knuckles and thumbs. Make sure you know how to use the bench presses at your gym.

Incline Fly-Press

The incline dumbbell fly is an essential exercise for the strengthening of your chest and upper body. Armed with an incline bench and a pair of dumbbells, you can bolster your entire fitness routine.
As stated, the chest muscle, scientifically known as the pectoralis major, is the primary muscle worked by the incline dumbbell fly. Your pecs are made up of two heads: the clavicular head, which comprises the upper chest, and the sternal head, which makes up the mid to lower chest.

While both heads are engaged during the lift, the incline of the bench places more tension on the clavicular head of the pectoralis major.

  1. Elevate one end of a flat exercise bench on two or three heavy barbell plates (the same as you did for incline press described above).
  2. Lie back on the bench with your head at the elevated end, holding two medium-heavy dumbbells at arm’s length above your chest, palms facing inward.
  3. Slowly lower the dumbbells directly out to the sides, simultaneously bending your elbows and squeezing your shoulder blades together until your chest is comfortably stretched and your elbows are at about a 90-degree angle. (If you experience shoulder pain in the fully stretched position, limit the range of motion).
  4. Reverse the movement, contracting your pecs as you straighten your arms fully, until you are back in the starting position.

Standard flyes are great for building muscle—but brutal on the shoulders. Bend the arms as you lower the weights, explains Rusin, and you maintain the stress on the pecs while taking it off the shoulder joints.

Mixed-Style Incline Dumbbell Press

Mixed-Style Incline Dumbbell Press

Lie on a bench set to a 30-degree incline, holding medium-weight dumbbells directly over your shoulders. Keeping your left arm straight, lower the right dumbbell to your chest and press it back up; repeat. Next, keep your right arm straight, lower the left dumbbell to your chest, and press it back up; repeat. Now lower both dumbbells to your chest and press them back up; repeat. Go through the sequence 2 more times for 1 set. Do 4 sets.

Flat Dumbbell Bench Press

The dumbbell bench press is a horizontal pressing exercise. That means the arms are pressed outward and perpendicular to your body. The main muscles used in this exercise are:

Pectoralis major: This muscle group is the reason that most people do this exercise; it gives your pecs a great workout. Your pecs are the muscles on the front of your chest. Their primary function is horizontal flexion and medial rotation of the shoulder joint.

Anterior deltoids: Working alongside your pecs, the anterior deltoids or front shoulder muscles are also involved in horizontal flexion and medial rotation of the shoulder joint. It’s virtually impossible to work your pecs without your anterior delts.

For this classic upper body exercise, lie on your back on a flat bench with your feet firmly on the floor and your arms extended over your chest, holding a dumbbell in each hand. Your palms should face forward.

  1. Slowly bend your arms to lower the dumbbells down and outward until they are on either side of your chest.
  2. Extend your arms straight up and over your chest again, pressing back up to the starting position. Pause briefly at the top before repeating for 8-12 reps.

Dumbbell Chest Flyes

Dumbbell Chest Flyes

The dumbbell chest fly is an upper body exercise that can help to strengthen the chest and shoulders. The traditional way to perform a dumbbell chest fly is to do the move while lying on your back on a flat or incline bench. There’s also a standing variation.

The 6 steps to perfect a dumbbell fly:

  1. Sit down on a flat bench with a dumbbell in each hand resting on your thighs. (The palms of your hands should be facing each other).
  2. Lower yourself down until you’re lying flat. The dumbbell should remain close to your chest.
  3. Once you’re lying flat, press the dumbbells up above your chest. This is your starting position.
  4. With a slight bend in your elbows, lower your arms laterally until you feel a stretch in your chest. The dumbbells should be level with your chest at both sides.
  5. Return your arms to the starting position and squeeze your pecs together. Remember to keep your arms steady throughout the movement.
  6. Don’t let the dumbbells touch as they meet at the top, holding for a second in the contracted position. Repeat the movement for the amount of reps you need.

A spotter can be used for additional support should you need it. Remember, you don’t need to lift heavy with this exercise.

Straight-Arm Pullover

The pullover exercise is very good for improving the strength of most of the muscles in the upper body through a full range of motion, thus also boosting the mobility and strength of the shoulder muscle. It is an excellent complement to the more popular bench press and lat pull down exercises. A dumbbell (DB) is specified for use with this exercise, although it can also be done with a barbell.
Who should do it?: I have found this exercise particularly useful for runners with tight shoulders and rounded upper backs. It is also specific to any overhead movement, such as javelin throw, tennis serve, badminton shot, rugby hooker’s throw-in and football throw-in.

  1. Lie down on your back on one end of the bench and hold one dumbbell with both hands above your chest area, arms extended.
  2. Raise the dumbbell straight up until your arms are perpendicular to the floor and lower it back after a short pause.
  3. Keep your arms extended throughout by keeping still the angle of your elbows.

Standing Upward Chest Fly

Standing dumbbell chest fly is a good workout to target your upper chest.

With only a pair of dumbbells, you can make your chest area broader and more developed.

Similar to the first standing chest exercise, this dumbbell chest fly is pretty straightforward.

  1. Stand at a shoulder-width distance on your feet.
  2. Hold one dumbbell in each hand. Bring your arms to your front until they are at your chest height. Make sure your palms face each other.
  3. Lower the dumbbells slowly with your arms slightly bend. This moves the weight behind you, which increases the motion.

Dumbbell Close-Grip Press

Dumbbell Close-Grip Press

Some of the benefits of the close grip bench press is it can build strength in the triceps. It may improve elbow extension and it can also reduce stress on the shoulders while benching.

If you are looking for some other great tricep exercises try Tricep Dips, Overhead Cable Extension, Reverse Plank Tricep Dips, Lying Tricep Extension or Cable Rope Triceps Pushdown.

The tricep is a large muscle on the back of the arm. It consists of 3 parts: the medial, lateral, and long head. It begins just below the socket of the shoulder blade and at two distinct areas of the humerus. One of the tricep’s main responsibilities is extending the elbow joint or simply straightening the arm.

  1. Grab a pair of dumbbells in each hand, lie on a bench set to a 45-degree incline
  2. Hold a pair of dumbbells at arm’s length above your chest, palms forward
  3. Keep your core braced and your elbows close to your body
  4. Lower the dumbbells to the sides of your chest
  5. Pause, and then push the weights back up to the starting position
  6. Complete 3-4 sets of 8-15 repetitions

Dumbbell Flyes Press

Dumbbell flyes, a bodybuilding favourite, are an isolation exercise and are usually performed after big compound lifts, like the bench and incline press. Dumbbell flyes are considered to be the perfect finishing move and a great way to focus on your chest after a lot of pressing exercises.

What’s more, you don’t need to lift as heavy as dumbbell flyes are usually completed with lower weights — focusing on the form and squeeze held with every rep.

If you’re looking to build a bigger, well-shaped chest with that ‘chest separation”’ look, dumbbell flyes are a must-have addition to your workout routine.

The 6 steps to perfect a dumbbell fly:

  1. Sit down on a flat bench with a dumbbell in each hand resting on your thighs. (The palms of your hands should be facing each other).
  2. Lower yourself down until you’re lying flat. The dumbbell should remain close to your chest.
  3. Once you’re lying flat, press the dumbbells up above your chest. This is your starting position.
  4. With a slight bend in your elbows, lower your arms laterally until you feel a stretch in your chest. The dumbbells should be level with your chest at both sides.
  5. Return your arms to the starting position and squeeze your pecs together. Remember to keep your arms steady throughout the movement.
  6. Don’t let the dumbbells touch as they meet at the top, holding for a second in the contracted position. Repeat the movement for the amount of reps you need.

Single-Arm Offset Dumbbell Bench Press

Single-Arm Offset Dumbbell Bench Press

The single arm dumbbell bench press is a good exercise to build into accessory programs for strength and power athletes as it can increase unilateral pressing strength, increase muscle activation, and help a lifter who may be coming back from an injury (it can help address muscle imbalances and improve movement patterning). By pressing one dumbbell at a time, you can also help engage core and hip muscles to better stabilize a lifter on the bench, which can then be used during bilateral pressing movements.

How To Do It: Lie on a bench with your left glute and left shoulder blade on the bench and right glute and right shoulder blade off the bench. (Alternatively, set up perpendicular to the bench, so only your upper back is supported, as shown here.) Hold a dumbbell in your right hand and hold on to the bench with your left hand above your head. Lower the weight until your elbow is in line with your shoulder. Return to starting position. Continue for 10 reps and then switch sides.

Dumbbell Floor Press

The dumbbell floor press provides an explosive power and triceps-isolating exercise in its short range of movement. While from afar it may seem an easier version of the bench press it is actually a useful addition to help to improve the lockout and one rep max of your bench press.

Why it rocks: Barbell bench press? Who needs it! This one challenges not only your chest, but your upper back, too.

How to: Lie on back with knees bent and feet flat on the floor, about a foot from seat. Hold a dumbbell in each hand with backs of upper arms resting on floor. From here, press dumbbells up by extending arms straight. Then, with control, bend at elbows to lower weights down until triceps touch the floor. That’s one rep. Perform eight to 12 reps, rest for 15 seconds, then continue on to your next move. (You’re doing five to eight total.) Once you’re finished, rest for one minute, then repeat twice more for a total of three rounds.

Decline Dumbbell Bench Press

he decline version of the basic dumbbell press allows you to perform the exercise with a greater range of motion than the other variations. It engages more muscle fibers than the barbell press, helping in stabilizing the body. It is suitable for those gym trainees who want to develop the lower part of their chest.

  1. Elevate one end of a flat exercise bench on two or three heavy barbell plates.
  2. Lie back on the bench, your head at the lower end, holding two heavy dumbbells at arm’s length above your chest. Place your feet flat on the bench.
  3. Slowly bend your elbows and pull your shoulder blades together on the bench, lowering the dumbbells until they are close to the sides of your chest.
  4. Pause in the stretched position, and then press the dumbbells back to the starting position.

The slight decline works the pecs with the shoulders in a centrated—or neutral—position. This balanced position permits maximal drive from your muscles, while the decline angle recruits more of the muscle fibers that connect to the sternum (targeting the lower chest). Want to load up on a chest exercise? Choose this one. It’s safer than doing flat or incline presses with heavy weight.

Lying Dumbbell Chest Fly

The dumbbell chest fly can help open up your chest muscles. Chest openers may help reduce upper back pain, increase range of motion, and reduce tightness in the upper body.

If you’re doing dumbbell chest flies as a way to open up your chest muscles, consider using lighter weights, or even no weights. That can help you to get the full range of motion from the move without overextending. Extending too far may lead to an injury.

How to: Lie on back with knees bent and feet flat on the floor. Hold a dumbbell in each hand and rest elbows on floor at sides angled away from body at 45 degrees. This is your start position. Press back into floor, engage core, exhale, and draw hands together above chest, maintaining slight bend in arms. With control, reverse the movement to return to start. That’s one rep. Perform eight to 12 reps, rest for 15 seconds, then continue on to your next move. (You’re doing five to eight total.) Once you’re finished, rest for one minute, then repeat twice more for a total of three rounds.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

GIPHY App Key not set. Please check settings

The Best Chest Exercises and Workouts To Strong Upper Body

The Best Chest Exercises and Workouts To Strong Upper Body

The Best Cardio Kickboxing Workouts at Home - Fat Melting Routine

The Best Cardio Kickboxing Workouts at Home – Fat Melting Routine